Author: editor

Columbus Concealed Gun Expansion Moves Forward

COLUMBUS – Ohioans could bring concealed guns into more places, including universities and day cares, under a bill lawmakers plan to send to Gov. John Kasich Thursday. Controversial after the attack last month at Ohio State University, the bill would expand the list of places where Ohioans can carry a concealed handgun. Proposed additions: day cares, private aircraft, airports before the security line and universities if their boards approve concealed guns on campus. Concealed guns would not be permitted in police departments – a location stripped from the proposal Wednesday afternoon after complaints from law enforcement officers – and county commissioners could prevent concealed carry in...

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2016 Gun Sales Record High

It appears more guns were sold in the United States during just the first 11 months of 2016 than in any previous year. More than 24.7 million criminal background checks for gun transactions were processed between the start of this year and the end of November, according to data from the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS. By comparison, about 23.1 million such checks were processed in all of 2015, which was the highest total ever for a single year dating back to the late 1990s, when the NICS began. Those figures do not show how...

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Old Guns Made Into Art

Jonathan Ferrara is a modern art gallery owner driven by an old-fashioned idea: He wants the pieces he has gathered at his gallery in New Orleans to hold a mirror up to society and reflect an issue that has become a touchy one for Americans. He wants Americans to see our relationship with guns for what it is. His traveling art installation of modern sculptures, photographs, paintings, video and mixed media uses more than 180 decommissioned guns, mostly bought through the New Orleans Police Department’s buyback program, as raw material. The art is also captured in a new book, “Guns in the Hands of Artists.” Like the mission Picasso had in creating “Guernica” — to raise critical awareness about the suffering and horror of the Spanish civil war after the Nazis wiped out an entire city — Ferrara wants this art to start a difficult conversation. For More Information...

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Levi’s CEO Asks Shoppers to “Leave Guns Home”

The chief executive of the Levi Strauss & Co jeans company waded into the U.S. gun control debate on Wednesday, with an open letter asking customers not to bring their firearms into its stores because doing so could make employees and other shoppers uncomfortable. In an open letter published on the social media site LinkedIn, Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh said he respects gun rights, which are protected by the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, but does not consider a clothing store an appropriate venue to carry firearms. “It boils down to this: you shouldn’t have to be concerned...

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Homemade Gun Silencers Clash With Federal Law

When Shane Cox began selling his homemade firearms and silencers out of his military surplus store, he stamped “Made in Kansas” on them to assure buyers that a Kansas law would prevent federal prosecution of anyone owning firearms made, sold and kept in the state. The 45-year-old Chanute resident also handed out copies to customers of the Second Amendment Protection Act passed in 2013 by the Kansas Legislature and signed by Gov. Sam Brownback, and even collected sales taxes. His biggest selling item was unregistered gun silencers that were flying out of the shop as fast as Cox could make them, prosecutors said later. One of those customers — 28-year-old Jeremy Kettler of Chanute — was so enthusiastic about the silencer that he posted a video on Facebook. But last week a jury found Cox guilty of violating federal law for the manufacture, sale and possession of unregistered firearms and silencers. Kettler was found guilty on one count for possessing the unregistered silencer. The case could reverberate across the country because it cites the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, pitting the federal government’s right to regulate firearms against the rights of states. The judge overseeing the case expects it ultimately to end up before the U.S. Supreme Court. At trial, defense attorneys contended their clients believed the Kansas law made their activities legal, arguing they are “caught in...

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